PED 4177: Teaching English Senior Division

Taking the current global crisis into consideration and the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action, we will consider how to teach English responsively during a pandemic and will work to develop the practice of teaching senior English through working with contemporary Indigenous authors and media reportage in alignment with NBE curriculum expectations — and to […]


Taking the current global crisis into consideration and the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action, we will consider how to teach English responsively during a pandemic and will work to develop the practice of teaching senior English through working with contemporary Indigenous authors and media reportage in alignment with NBE curriculum expectations — and to think carefully about how teaching English works in tandem with citizenship education. 

There are three essential questions which frame this course:

  • How will the ongoing work of considering my own identity formation and subjectivities contribute to my work as an educator? 
  • How does the media play into and/or disrupt representations of the enduring realities of Indigenous people today?
  • How do I create a senior English class that meets the needs of students and inspires them to be responsible and productive citizens by engaging in a lifetime of critical practices for social justice? 

This course has three central learning expectations:

1. Consider the dynamics of identity formation and subjectivities in relation to our reading practices and how this impacts our work as educators. 

  • Demonstrate an openness to innovation and change by imagining different ways of being and acting in the world. 
  • Critically inquire into your positionality, and consider how racism and antiracism operate in schools and in the English classroom and teaching practice 
  • Attending to unpacking one’s own identity formation and realizing it is a process that requires lifelong reflexivity, engagement, and collaboration.
  • Develop awareness of one’s own subjectivities. 
  • Develop strategies of preparing for encounters with difficult/transformative knowledge and affective dynamics (denial, bias, resistance, disavowal) that often accompany this learning.
  • Explore and question your individual and collective relationships with power within a Canadian context.
  • Engage with a variety of Indigenous ways of knowing and being and consider how they may interrelate and co-exist with your own and others’ beliefs and identities.
  • Consider how literature and media, indeed multiliteracies, play a role in social justice interventions.
  • Explore how to become an agent of change working collaboratively with colleagues, in-school personnel, parents/guardians, and the community-at-large. 

2. Engage with pedagogy and theoretical frameworks.

  • Critically examine, interpret, and apply Ministry of Education curriculum expectations and Ministry of Education and district school board policies and guidelines related to the senior division, which includes its commitment to the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.
  • Have a theoretical understanding and foundation necessary to design, implement and assess programs for the senior division student.
  • Understand how to use, accommodate, and modify expectations, strategies and assessment practices based on the development or special needs to the senior division student.

3. Analyze and apply relevant teaching strategies and techniques.

  • Create learning environments conducive to the intellectual, social, emotional, physical, linguistic, cultural, spiritual, and moral development of the senior division student.
  • Demonstrate adaptability and innovation in instruction and planning to appropriately respond to the effects that conflicts, pandemics, and natural disasters have on schooling and the wellbeing of students, staff, and communities.
  • Incorporate critical media analysis of Indigenous reportage in lesson planning, to develop systemic and interrelationship-minded thinking between literature and current affairs and demonstrate how these works reflect Indigenous lived experiences.
  • Access a variety of resources, including technological resources, within and beyond the educational system to enhance and support student learning.
  • Demonstrate the ability to integrate information and communication technology into teaching practice.

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